Medical Communication

Archive for July, 2009

Medical consultation on the Move

Posted by drneelesh on July 30, 2009

A new mobile handheld technology developed by mVisum of Cedar Brook, NJ, is been tested. This communication tool boasts of providing off-site cardiologists access to EKGs that can then be used to prescribe immediate treatment.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is testing this new system which seemingly enables fast transfer of clinical data to a smartphone for review within minutes. The mVisum Medical Communication System is stated to be a communication tool which permits health-care personnel to securely receive, review and respond to a patient”s medical data recorded at the point of care. This transfer of information notably takes place through secure HIPAA compliant internet servers, later transmitting it via mobile technology to the smartphone of the physician. More so, this system is also loaded with the ability to be availability aware, so that the patient can refer to another physician in the absence of the original intended physician. The various types of medical data that can be sent through this technique include DICOM images, EKGs, CT scans, MRIs, X-rays, etc. Along with this, textual information relating to the patient may also be included in the message for the purpose of getting a broader idea about the condition of the patient.

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

The process begins with the recording of patient data at the point of care. Point of Care can include the physician’s office, medical center, hospital, or anywhere the patient is located and an system is installed.Data is transmitted securely and reliably to the physician’s mobile handheld device. The system has advanced technology that allows the system to be availability aware,so that another physician can immediately be contacted if the original intended physician is unavailable.Once received, the physician can review data and securely respond with medical opinion, prescription or other critical orders.


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Medical consultation on the Move

Posted by drneelesh on July 30, 2009

A new mobile handheld technology developed by mVisum of Cedar Brook, NJ, is been tested. This communication tool boasts of providing off-site cardiologists access to EKGs that can then be used to prescribe immediate treatment.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is testing this new system which seemingly enables fast transfer of clinical data to a smartphone for review within minutes. The mVisum Medical Communication System is stated to be a communication tool which permits health-care personnel to securely receive, review and respond to a patient”s medical data recorded at the point of care. This transfer of information notably takes place through secure HIPAA compliant internet servers, later transmitting it via mobile technology to the smartphone of the physician. More so, this system is also loaded with the ability to be availability aware, so that the patient can refer to another physician in the absence of the original intended physician. The various types of medical data that can be sent through this technique include DICOM images, EKGs, CT scans, MRIs, X-rays, etc. Along with this, textual information relating to the patient may also be included in the message for the purpose of getting a broader idea about the condition of the patient.

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

The process begins with the recording of patient data at the point of care. Point of Care can include the physician’s office, medical center, hospital, or anywhere the patient is located and an system is installed.Data is transmitted securely and reliably to the physician’s mobile handheld device. The system has advanced technology that allows the system to be availability aware,so that another physician can immediately be contacted if the original intended physician is unavailable.Once received, the physician can review data and securely respond with medical opinion, prescription or other critical orders.


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Basics of Cerebrovascular accidents

Posted by drneelesh on July 18, 2009

Legendary CBS newscaster Walter Cronkite, who many referred to as “Uncle Walt,” has passed away, CBS News reports. He was 92 years old. As the CBS anchorman for almost 20 years, he was one of the most trusted faces in the American media. Reports say that he died due to a “cerebro-vascular accident” (also called Stroke) without specifying the exact pathology.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disturbed in some way. As a result, brain cells are starved of oxygen. This causes some cells to die and leaves other cells damaged. Most strokes happen when a blood clot blocks one of the arteries (blood vessels) that carry blood to the brain. This type of stroke is called an ischaemic stroke. Cerebral hemorrhage is when a blood vessel bursts inside the brain and bleeds (hemorrhages). With a hemorrhagic stroke, blood seeps into the brain tissue and causes extra damage.

  • Smokers
  • Irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation)
  • Diabetes

Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to decreasing mortality due to a stroke. A transient ischemic attack (known as a TIA or ministroke) is similar to a stroke except that, with a TIA, the symptoms go away completely within 24 hours. People who have a TIA are very likely to have a stroke in the near future.

The most common early signs of a CVA are:

  • weakness down one side of the body, ranging from numbness to paralysis that can affect the arm and leg. Often, the weakness starts at a focal point and increases over the next few hours as the hemorrhage increases.
  • weakness down one side of the face, causing the mouth to droop. Speech may become slurry and swallowing becomes difficult.
  • severe headache and sudden loss of vision.
  • confusion, vomiting and loss of balance.

The World Health Organization estimates that 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide each year, resulting in 5 million deaths and 5 million people permanently disabled.Stroke can occur in patients of all ages, including children. The Risk of stroke increases with age, especially in patients older than 64 years, in whom 75% of all strokes occur. Many people recover completely after a stroke. For others, it can take many months to recover from a stroke. Physical therapy and other retraining methods are greatly improving rehabilitation and recovery.

Posted in CVA, health, stroke | Leave a Comment »

Basics of Cerebrovascular accidents

Posted by drneelesh on July 18, 2009

Legendary CBS newscaster Walter Cronkite, who many referred to as “Uncle Walt,” has passed away, CBS News reports. He was 92 years old. As the CBS anchorman for almost 20 years, he was one of the most trusted faces in the American media. Reports say that he died due to a “cerebro-vascular accident” (also called Stroke) without specifying the exact pathology.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disturbed in some way. As a result, brain cells are starved of oxygen. This causes some cells to die and leaves other cells damaged. Most strokes happen when a blood clot blocks one of the arteries (blood vessels) that carry blood to the brain. This type of stroke is called an ischaemic stroke. Cerebral hemorrhage is when a blood vessel bursts inside the brain and bleeds (hemorrhages). With a hemorrhagic stroke, blood seeps into the brain tissue and causes extra damage.

  • Smokers
  • Irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation)
  • Diabetes

Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to decreasing mortality due to a stroke. A transient ischemic attack (known as a TIA or ministroke) is similar to a stroke except that, with a TIA, the symptoms go away completely within 24 hours. People who have a TIA are very likely to have a stroke in the near future.

The most common early signs of a CVA are:

  • weakness down one side of the body, ranging from numbness to paralysis that can affect the arm and leg. Often, the weakness starts at a focal point and increases over the next few hours as the hemorrhage increases.
  • weakness down one side of the face, causing the mouth to droop. Speech may become slurry and swallowing becomes difficult.
  • severe headache and sudden loss of vision.
  • confusion, vomiting and loss of balance.

The World Health Organization estimates that 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide each year, resulting in 5 million deaths and 5 million people permanently disabled.Stroke can occur in patients of all ages, including children. The Risk of stroke increases with age, especially in patients older than 64 years, in whom 75% of all strokes occur. Many people recover completely after a stroke. For others, it can take many months to recover from a stroke. Physical therapy and other retraining methods are greatly improving rehabilitation and recovery.

Posted in CVA, health, stroke | Leave a Comment »

Use of Forensic animations

Posted by drneelesh on July 17, 2009

Bose–Einstein condensate In the July 14, 1995 ...

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The law review literature is full of clichés such as “A picture is worth a thousand words” . Be it the judge or a Jury, it is very difficult to explain certain scientific and medical aspects by simple oral description. Technology of 3D animations is now freely available and can be used to explain many complicated medical and scientific arguments.Though animations have been around for many decades, its use in forensics started only by late 1980″s.

By 1992, it was estimated that computer- generated displays had been used in 858 cases in the US where litigation took place between major companies. In these, all except 15 settled out of court and in all the 15 cases which went to trial, the side using computer-generated displays was successful. Thus it is very apparent that use of scientifically created animations can go a long way in winning legal cases.

It has been reported that the first instance of computer-generated graphics being used in a British court took place at Oxford Crown Court in September 1994. There is yet no famous case of use of Animations in Indian courts. Animations can be used for demonstrative evidence, and the admissibility of animations in courts have been clearly expressed by the British courts. The following presentation takes an overview of animations used in Forensic sciences. To find out how you can use Animations in India, contact us at info@markivmedical.com, and visit us at Mark IV Studios, Coimbatore, India.

Requirement of Forensic Animations

Posted in forensics, Law, US | Leave a Comment »

Use of Forensic animations

Posted by drneelesh on July 17, 2009

Bose–Einstein condensate In the July 14, 1995 ...

Slide 2 .O {font-size:149%;}

The law review literature is full of clichés such as “A picture is worth a thousand words” . Be it the judge or a Jury, it is very difficult to explain certain scientific and medical aspects by simple oral description. Technology of 3D animations is now freely available and can be used to explain many complicated medical and scientific arguments.Though animations have been around for many decades, its use in forensics started only by late 1980″s.

By 1992, it was estimated that computer- generated displays had been used in 858 cases in the US where litigation took place between major companies. In these, all except 15 settled out of court and in all the 15 cases which went to trial, the side using computer-generated displays was successful. Thus it is very apparent that use of scientifically created animations can go a long way in winning legal cases.

It has been reported that the first instance of computer-generated graphics being used in a British court took place at Oxford Crown Court in September 1994. There is yet no famous case of use of Animations in Indian courts. Animations can be used for demonstrative evidence, and the admissibility of animations in courts have been clearly expressed by the British courts. The following presentation takes an overview of animations used in Forensic sciences. To find out how you can use Animations in India, contact us at info@markivmedical.com, and visit us at Mark IV Studios, Coimbatore, India.

Requirement of Forensic Animations

Posted in forensics, Law, US | Leave a Comment »

Prozac- Things to know before you use it.

Posted by drneelesh on July 15, 2009

Fluoxetine HCl 20mg Capsules (Prozac)

Prozac ( or Fluoxetine Hydrochloride ) is a commonly used antidepressant in clinical practice. Fluoxetine has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa and panic disorder. Used since mid-1970a, Eli Lilly’s patent on Prozac (fluoxetine) expired in August, 2001, prompting an influx of generic drugs onto the market. It has shown excellent results and is often used by people/patients even without proper prescriptions. The use , and abuse of Prozac has reached phenomenal proportions.Is Prozac safe?? What are the few things you must know before you start using it?

Below is a slideshow i have prepared detailing a few important facts about Prozac use. Also incorporated is a video which will further enhance comprehension about this widely used drug.



View more presentations from Neelesh Bhandari. (tags: bhandari neelesh)


Related articles

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Prozac- Things to know before you use it.

Posted by drneelesh on July 15, 2009

Fluoxetine HCl 20mg Capsules (Prozac)

Prozac ( or Fluoxetine Hydrochloride ) is a commonly used antidepressant in clinical practice. Fluoxetine has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa and panic disorder. Used since mid-1970a, Eli Lilly’s patent on Prozac (fluoxetine) expired in August, 2001, prompting an influx of generic drugs onto the market. It has shown excellent results and is often used by people/patients even without proper prescriptions. The use , and abuse of Prozac has reached phenomenal proportions.Is Prozac safe?? What are the few things you must know before you start using it?

Below is a slideshow i have prepared detailing a few important facts about Prozac use. Also incorporated is a video which will further enhance comprehension about this widely used drug.



View more presentations from Neelesh Bhandari. (tags: bhandari neelesh)


Related articles

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Prescription drug marketing in India

Posted by drneelesh on July 2, 2009

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The guidelines for pharmaceutical marketing are typically debated all over the world, more so in India. Many issues are not clear and the drug industry interprets the rules the best it can . Cases of unethical promotion of drugs to the health care industry come up with regularity in the western world. Fortunately, no major case has been reported in the Indian media at present. But thats because many such unethical promotional activities havent come to light. There is an urgent need to inform all the concerned parties of the regulatory Dos and Donts of pharmaceutical marketing in India.

Promotion of drugs in India is governed by three major documents. THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS ACT, 1940 is defined as An Act to regulate the import, manufacture, distribution and sale of drugs and cosmetics in India. It has last been amended in 1995 and new amendments are overdue. The Rules 96 and 97 of THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS RULES, 1945 describe the essential information to be provided regarding labeling of drugs. The product monograph should comprise the full prescribing information necessary to enable a physician to use the drug properly. It should include description, actions, indications, dosage precaution, drug interactions, warnings and adverse reactions.

The OPPI code of conduct ( effective since 1st January 2007) sets out the guidelines to be followed for promotion of prescription drugs to the health care industry. It is based on the IFPMA code and incorporates local region ( India) specific guidelines. it sets out certain principles basic to the ethical promotion of pharmaceuticals in the country. Though it is widely followed, it is not legally binding and the final responsibility for implementation lies with the pharmaceutical marketing organizations themselves.

Below is a short presentation document outlining the Major points in marketing pharmacutical products to the health care industry.

http://bit.ly/nHqwE–

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Propofol as Drug of Abuse

Posted by drneelesh on July 1, 2009

Is Propofol, or Diprivan what Michael Jackson Used for ( Drug) Abuse ?

According to Cherilyn Lee, a registered nurse who operates a Los Angeles-based nutritional counseling business, in California, “Jackson was complaining of insomnia and pleaded for her to get him some (Diprivan)”. Other reports claim Propofol was recovered from his residence. This conversation reportedly occurred in April of this year. Preliminary reports say that M.J died of cardiac arrest, which is within the possible effects of unmonitored Diprivan use. (A rapid bolus injection can result in undesirable cardiorespiratory depression including hypotension, apnea, airway obstruction, and oxygen desaturation.)

Diprivan is a general anesthetic, used to start or maintain anesthesia during certain surgeries, tests, or procedures. It is available in a white vial of 20, 50 and 100 ml (containing 10mg/ml.).Most adults require 2 to 2.5 mg/kg of the drug ( approx. 10 ml). DIPRIVAN Injectable Emulsion is an IV sedative-hypnotic agent and can cause potentiation of other narcotic drugs and benzodiazepines when used together. The most common side-effects include Change in mood or emotions; dizziness; drowsiness; lack of coordination. It is given intravenously, usually within the operation theater or in a clinic. It has a rapid onset of action ( less than 1 min) and short duration of action (approximately 10 min but is dose dependent).It has direct cardiodepressant effects, leading to decreased blood pressure and heart rate in higher doses. Its actions causing decreased heart rate and respiratory rate mean that use of propofol is done only under continuous monitoring of vital signs.Diprivan is not meant for use in pediatrics and elderly population since its safety has not been established in these populations. Prolonged use of propofol results in accumulation of the drug in body tissue and increases the duration of action as well as chances of overdose.

Rarely, Cases of death due to propofol have been discussed in medical literature. All these cases have occured in hospital settings only.It is definitely not meant for home use and this is the first time I have heard of Diprivan being used as a drug of abuse outside hospital settings.

Euphoria, sexual hallucinations and disinhibition have been described on recovery of propofol anaesthesia. These effects could explain the recreational use of the drug. Moreover, several experimental studies strongly suggest the potential for abuse and dependence on propofol,and few cases of abuse and dependency have been described, mostly in medical professionals. As propofol is generally not recognized as a substance of abuse, and because of its safe profile, it is important to remember that rare adverse reactions of propofol could produce death in a context of abuse, even at therapeutic dose range, in the absence of ventilatory and medical assistance.

British Journal of Anaesthesia 2006 97(2):268; doi:10.1093/bja/ael168

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