Medical Communication

Archive for the ‘Google’ Category

>Top 12 Ranked Web sites in India for December 2010:

Posted by drneelesh on January 29, 2011

>

188px-India_(orthographic_projection).svg
Alexa – Top Sites in India

Top Sites in India ranked for December 2010

The 1 month rank is calculated using a combination of average daily visitors and pageviews over the past month. The site with the highest combination of visitors and pageviews is ranked #1.

1) Google India
google.co.in
Indian version of this popular search engine. Search the whole web or only webpages from India…. More Interfaces offered in English, Hindi, Bengali, Telugu, Marathi and Tamil.

2) Google
google.com
Enables users to search the Web, Usenet, and images. Features include PageRank, caching and tra… Morenslation of results, and an option to find similar pages. The company’s focus is developing search technology.

3) Facebook
facebook.com
A social utility that connects people, to keep up with friends, upload photos, share links and … Morevideos.

4) Yahoo!
yahoo.com
A major internet portal and service provider offering search results, customizable content, cha… Moretrooms, free e-mail, clubs, and pager.

5) YouTube – Broadcast yourself
youtube.com
YouTube is a way to get your videos to the people who matter to you. Upload, tag and share your… More videos worldwide!
 
6) Blogger.com
blogspot.com
Free, automated weblog publishing tool that sends updates to a site via FTP.
 
7) Wikipedia
wikipedia.org
A free encyclopedia built collaboratively using wiki software. (Creative Commons Attribution-Sh… MoreareAlike License).

8) orkut.co.in
orkut.co.in
 
9) Rediff.com India Ltd.
rediff.com
Online portal with free e-mail and many other services.

10) Twitter
twitter.com
Social networking and microblogging service utilising instant messaging, SMS or a web interface..

11) LinkedIn
linkedin.com
A networking tool to find connections to recommended job candidates, industry experts and busin… Moreess partners. Allows registered users to maintain a list of contact details of people they know and trust in business.
 
12) Indiatimes
indiatimes.com
Portal site; includes news stories under subject headings, and links to other information sources.es.

Analysis and Pointers:

a) At least half of these dozen are hardcore social networking sites.Orkut is still doing reasonably well in India, and Facebook has fast climbed to number 3, after the obligatory Google Search.

b) Google India is on the first position and we wonder how many choose to surf the net in their local languages. This information can transform the way content is produced in India currently.If this data can be gathered, it will allow content creators to better plan their offerings.

c) The only two India based entities, Rediff and Indiatimes are web portals, with a strong presence in the e-commerce space. These two being popular shopping sites, this is another pointer to increasing online expenditure habits being formed.

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>The Best New Social LMS : TOPYX

Posted by drneelesh on January 9, 2011

>

Social LMS is the new buzz-word in eLearning. Everyones wants an elearning platform which allows social features like connecting, forming interest groups and building communities.
Such features are not well defined in the earlier breed of LMS like Blackboard or Moodle.What it needs is an affordable, fully-hosted social learning management system (social LMS) eLearning software as a service (SaaS) solution with integrated, innovative social learning resources that meet the needs of today’s learners.
TOPYX is a revolutionary eLearning 2.0 platform that ingeniously integrates learning content, assignment tracking facilities and social learning. Using the most advanced technology, TOPYX brings the best interactive software together into a single platform—giving educators, trainers and learners the ultimate resource for all their knowledge-sharing needs.
TOPYX is already used by many corporates, including Johnson and Johnson. It is 100% web based and works within the browser, so no need to download anything! It is fully integrated with community building features and single user sig-on. Also, Social networking plug-in compatibility (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc) gives it the edge over many other similar LMSs.
It is provided as a service, so you don’t need to dirty your hands with complicated coding. Just pay and start using! Its customizable, so easy to add branding! It lets you embed multimedia in a variety of formats. It has already been voted as eLearning – Best of 2010 winner.It is used by a number of corporate houses from different verticals and has proved itself adaptable for all kinds of niche needs.
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>The Top 5 Health and Fitness Websites of 2010

Posted by drneelesh on December 13, 2010

>

top 5 ways

.

The Time magazine has recently published a list of Top 50 websites in 2010

The point to note in all the medical ( and also non-medical) websites is that almost all websites are directly benefitting the consumer. These are websites which add Value. Most of these websites allow you to use various tools, like Google Maps or online videos, to derive maximum benefits.
Also, all these websites allow creation of Communities. Thus these websites are good community portals, allowing visitors to connect with each other and thus learn more.
Below are the 5 websites from the Health and Fitness category:
Health & Fitness
  • Keas : Founded by the former head of Google Health, Keas aims to provide tailored health programs for individual users by combining personal medical data with general health advice. Companies like Quest Diagnostics have teamed up with Keas to input personal data, like blood-test results, to the site.
  • Mayo Clinic : The renowned Mayo Clinic‘s website keeps its tips legitimate, combining ease of use with sound medical advice. The site offers an encyclopedic index of diseases and a symptom checker to see what that forehead pain could mean.
  • Exercise TV: On-demand cable channel Exercise TV allows you to get fit with only a laptop and some extra floor space. Every month, the channel’s site uploads more than 100 free workout videos. You can pay to download the clips or you can stream them online cost-free.
  • Fit by Fun : Fit by Fun animates your exercise with illustrated trainers, upbeat music and a community feel, giving you a list of “classmates” currently using the site. The fickle can adjust their workout scenery and sound track. Though many of its classes and services, like progress tracking, require a paid membership, some are free.
  • Walk Jog Run: Walk Jog Run utilizes Google Maps and community involvement to map out the best routes in your area. Just input your address and user-generated routes will appear, handily mapped out and measured by distance, speed and calories burned. 

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FAQs regarding use of Internet in health care.- Pew Research report

Posted by drneelesh on November 26, 2009

The Pew Internet/Health FAQ |
Original post on e-Patients.net

The lessons learnt from Pew internet research report on e-patients.

Susannah Fox is an Associate Director of the Pew Internet & American Life Project and principal author of the Project’s survey reports on e-patients and online health. Here, Susannah displays an almost naive view of a health consumer”s requirements and sounds arrogant at places, especially while talking of Privacy rights.

Read her <edited> views on Use of internet by e-patients.

  • Is a cultural shift affecting health care?

Yes. Thanks to the internet, people increasingly expect to have access to information. They increasingly expect to be able to comment on and easily share information. And it turns out that participation matters as much as access.

  • How do people judge the quality of health information online?

The best they can, but probably not the way you think they should. Most people’s first stop for health information is a general search site. Google dominates the search market. A British Medical Journal article found that Google is a pretty good diagnostician. Very few people report bad outcomes from their online health research.

  • Who’s in charge of vetting health information online? Shouldn’t we be concerned about this?

Nobody’s “in charge” and to some degree, yes. The base of the internet population is broadening to include people with less education and lower health literacy/numeracy. E-patients with a high school degree or less are more likely than better-educated e-patients to say they were confused by the health information they found online. But note that the two groups are equally likely (and more likely) to say they felt confident to raise new questions or concerns with their doctor, too. Also read-*Medical Library Association’s consumer guide  AND*Alicia White’s “Keep Calm and Carry On” advice for reading health news (PDF).

  • What are doctor’s attitudes?

I don’t know, but Manhattan Research and ThinkHealth do.

  • Are patients ready for this?

The Center for Studying Health System Change’s study measuring “patient activation” is one indicator. The central role of family caregivers is not addressed in the study, however. Another indicator is the relentless popularity of health information online. Lots and lots of people are looking up information on all kinds of health topics.

  • What about privacy?

Daniel Solove’s taxonomy of the word “privacyhas forever changed my thinking about the changing nature of personal information. In fact, I try to avoid using the word at all (instead: confidentiality, security, anonymity…)

Deven McGraw, Director of the Health Privacy Project at CDT, is a good source on health privacy regulations and enforcement. Jules Polonetsky, Director of the Future of Privacy Forum, is a more general source.

  • Does the internet cause cyberchondria?

Caution: “cyberchondria” is a loaded term. E-patients.net has hosted discussions of how to describe people who use the internet to gather health information. For example: Googlers vs. e-patients vs. cyberchondriacs.

  • What business opportunities are there in this field? What does the future hold?

I am watching the spread of wireless internet use very closely. Wireless access has a significant, independent effect on how someone uses the internet and it’s the trend I am most excited about tracking over the next year or so.

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FAQs regarding use of Internet in health care.- Pew Research report

Posted by drneelesh on November 26, 2009

The Pew Internet/Health FAQ |
Original post on e-Patients.net

The lessons learnt from Pew internet research report on e-patients.

Susannah Fox is an Associate Director of the Pew Internet & American Life Project and principal author of the Project’s survey reports on e-patients and online health. Here, Susannah displays an almost naive view of a health consumer”s requirements and sounds arrogant at places, especially while talking of Privacy rights.

Read her <edited> views on Use of internet by e-patients.

  • Is a cultural shift affecting health care?

Yes. Thanks to the internet, people increasingly expect to have access to information. They increasingly expect to be able to comment on and easily share information. And it turns out that participation matters as much as access.

  • How do people judge the quality of health information online?

The best they can, but probably not the way you think they should. Most people’s first stop for health information is a general search site. Google dominates the search market. A British Medical Journal article found that Google is a pretty good diagnostician. Very few people report bad outcomes from their online health research.

  • Who’s in charge of vetting health information online? Shouldn’t we be concerned about this?

Nobody’s “in charge” and to some degree, yes. The base of the internet population is broadening to include people with less education and lower health literacy/numeracy. E-patients with a high school degree or less are more likely than better-educated e-patients to say they were confused by the health information they found online. But note that the two groups are equally likely (and more likely) to say they felt confident to raise new questions or concerns with their doctor, too. Also read-*Medical Library Association’s consumer guide  AND*Alicia White’s “Keep Calm and Carry On” advice for reading health news (PDF).

  • What are doctor’s attitudes?

I don’t know, but Manhattan Research and ThinkHealth do.

  • Are patients ready for this?

The Center for Studying Health System Change’s study measuring “patient activation” is one indicator. The central role of family caregivers is not addressed in the study, however. Another indicator is the relentless popularity of health information online. Lots and lots of people are looking up information on all kinds of health topics.

  • What about privacy?

Daniel Solove’s taxonomy of the word “privacyhas forever changed my thinking about the changing nature of personal information. In fact, I try to avoid using the word at all (instead: confidentiality, security, anonymity…)

Deven McGraw, Director of the Health Privacy Project at CDT, is a good source on health privacy regulations and enforcement. Jules Polonetsky, Director of the Future of Privacy Forum, is a more general source.

  • Does the internet cause cyberchondria?

Caution: “cyberchondria” is a loaded term. E-patients.net has hosted discussions of how to describe people who use the internet to gather health information. For example: Googlers vs. e-patients vs. cyberchondriacs.

  • What business opportunities are there in this field? What does the future hold?

I am watching the spread of wireless internet use very closely. Wireless access has a significant, independent effect on how someone uses the internet and it’s the trend I am most excited about tracking over the next year or so.

Related articles

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drneelesh’s elearning topic- Nov 2009

Posted by drneelesh on November 19, 2009

— 
healthcare IT

drneelesh’s e-learning topic  

November 2009



  • ResearchGATE MasterBlog: The best of the scientific world
  • A Google Wave Cheat Sheet
Posted: 16 Nov 2009 12:49 PM PST
scienceroll.com


It’s a pleasure to announce that I will manage the MasterBlog of ResearchGATE, the biggest scientific community site. My job is to find and select the best content written by scientists in the community and share these with the readers. Here is what I wrote today in my new ResearchGATE blog:

Today we start streaming the best content produced by the ResearchGATE community here by sharing selected blog entries and microarticles. Blog entries will cover a wide variety of topics from all disciplines while microarticles are a summary of a peer-reviewed publication in 300 characters or less. We hope you find this blog useful and if you are a researcher, academic, journalist, or someone who uses research, we encourage you to join our community.

And an excerpt from the press release:

Efficient communication is the key to scientific progress, which is why the world’s largest academic  networking platform ResearchGATE is offering so many tools for exchanging ideas, papers, schedules and more. The latest application, to be introduced this week, makes it even easier for the 180,000 members to share news, thoughts and research results: Every profile within ResearchGATE now contains a personal blogging function.
Users are offered the choice between publishing just within their network or to a greater audience through their public profile. They can also submit entries to ResearchBLOG, the new public channel of the ResearchGATE scientific community. The highest quality posts from individual members are aggregated here to provide a reputable source for science news, commentary, research, and innovation from all fields of enquiry.

rg


Posted: 14 Nov 2009 05:37 AM PST
wave

The Google Wave Info blog has published a quick list of commands for use in Google Wave with the Google Wave Cheat Sheet. This mega-list provides syntax definitions in the following categories:

  • Search Cheat Sheet
  • Status
  • Participants
  • Date Search
  • Folders
  • Attachments
  • Tags
  • Gadgets
  • Expressions
  • Phrases
  • XML Search
  • Wave ID
  • Zero Inbox
  • Saved Searches
  • Filters
  • Folders
  • Language Filter

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        Few Self created Widgets

        Posted by drneelesh on May 27, 2009

        DashboardImage via Wikipedia

        Doctor”s Widgets

        Human rights document search



        All search engines– Just type in any keyword in any of the search engines and “ENTER”.





        Indulging my Space fantasies– ” A brief history of Blackholes”


        —————————————————————–



        Daily Clinical Alerts from National Institute of Health.
        ——————————————–


        Medical Dictonary– Type in and hit search to open in a new window



        RSS from Tech Medicine Blog
        Grazr
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        Learning tools and search engine ranking

        Posted by drneelesh on April 30, 2009


        Recently read the Latest edition of Journal of Health informatics in developing countries. Specifically, Search engines : a study of nine search engines in four categories by Dallas Knight (Health Informatics Programme University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand). This study’s objective was to determine how search engines within different categories compare, and to look at features and trends of search engines that are commonly used for queries by both health consumers and professionals.

        The query terms used for this study are

        • Ulcerative colitis
        • Benign positional vertigo
        • Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma
        • “online tool” for help with depression
        • exercise after bowel cancer operation

        Evaluation of the first ten sites for each scenario in each search engine included relevance, usefulness, usability of sites, and quality of health information evaluation.


        Search engines within the general category (Google, SearchYahoo!) performed best overall. Meta search engines (Dogpile, Jux2) also performed well with vertical search engines (Healia, Kosmix, Healthline) next. Health portals (Revolution Health and WebMD) produced relevant useful results for common terms, but not for unusual query terms.



        Other important medical education and learning tools the study talks about include

        • Custom built Search engines ( eg Google, Rollyo and EureksterSwiki )
        • Blog sites, wikis and podcasts
        • social bookmarking with Del.icio.us and Digg.com
        • RSS site feeds read by aggregators or emails
        • Yahoo Pipes! for channelizing information

        The few services and tools it missed include,


        I think i shall now close this list or i shall be spending hours trying to compile a complete list. Anyways, most of the useful tools for medical education and learning have been mentioned here. If you can think of any more study tools or services, kindly add them in the comments.

        Read the complete study Here

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