Medical Communication

Archive for the ‘health’ Category

Speaker list- FDA public hearing on Social media

Posted by drneelesh on October 30, 2009

In continuation of my last post on FDA meet regarding “Promotion of FDA-Regulated Medical Products Using the Internet and Social Media Tools” hearing, Heres the schedule and speaker list.Kindly note that this is only the first version and likely to be tweaked later depending on speaker availability at that time.

Hearing Date:  November 12 and 13, 2009
Hearing Name:  Promotion of FDA-Regulated Medical Products Using the Internet and Social Media Tools
Location:  National Transportation and Safety Board Conference Center, 429 L’Enfant Plaza, SW., Washington, DC 20594

FDA Public Hearing Speaker Schedule

There are other ways to stay informed–

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Posted in FDA, health, Social Media | Leave a Comment »

Recommended I.T skills for Medicos

Posted by drneelesh on October 28, 2009

Smalltechmeded

Everybody understands that a 21st century Doctor needs to have decent Information technology skills. These IT skills would help in making the person a better clinician, use data more effectively and make fewer errors.But what are the skills needed to make a good doctor?

Below is a presentation enumerating the I.T skills required in a Medical student before admission and at the end of graduation.These have been recommended by 3 top Medical schools under University of California and can serve as good reference guidelines.

http://viewer.docstoc.com/
Recommended IT skills for Medicos

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Twenty rules of engagement in new age marketing

Posted by drneelesh on September 25, 2009

Recently, Read this interesting synopsis of the changing rules of engagement in the online world. I have edited a few original writs and added a few, but in essence it replicates ideas of Rich Meyer.

Twenty New rules for engaging your customers

1. Traditional mass marketing is dead.

2. Brand marketers no longer control the  message.
3. Your audience is using social media whether you decide to use social or not.
4. Great marketing is not enough to ensure success.
5. Senior manager need to get middle managers more involved in formulating strategy and implementation of tactics.
6. The best marketing plans in the world mean nothing without flawless execution.
7. To get consumers to buy you product forget about features and start thinking about how you product provides solutions to their problems.
8. There is no such thing as free social media programs.
9. Social media programs need to be tied back to business objectives. Executives need to agree on a measurement criteria for social media programs.
10. Keep it simple. If you can’t clearly explain your strategy and message to your employees than you need to start over.
11. The days of free spending consumers maybe over. Today consumers are saving more and spending less. It’s all about needs rather than want.
12. Web analytics should tell you a story of how your consumers are thinking about your site and products.
13. Employers have all the power now and can lowball new hires and increase workloads on current employees. However this will eventually change and lot more people will seek to leave big companies in search of smaller companies where they can provide a lot more input and be satisfied with their work.
15. Lowering prices is not a marketing or brand strategy.
16. Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors.
17. Learn to see the world in the eyes of your customer or website visit.
18. Simplicity is the new currency.
19.Don’t favor credentials over passion.
20. Speed has become even more of a competitive advantage in the age of social media.

Rich’s Rules of New Economy

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Posted in Business, health, Health 2.0, Web 2.0 | Leave a Comment »

Twenty rules of engagement in new age marketing

Posted by drneelesh on September 25, 2009

Recently, Read this interesting synopsis of the changing rules of engagement in the online world. I have edited a few original writs and added a few, but in essence it replicates ideas of Rich Meyer.

Twenty New rules for engaging your customers

1. Traditional mass marketing is dead.

2. Brand marketers no longer control the  message.
3. Your audience is using social media whether you decide to use social or not.
4. Great marketing is not enough to ensure success.
5. Senior manager need to get middle managers more involved in formulating strategy and implementation of tactics.
6. The best marketing plans in the world mean nothing without flawless execution.
7. To get consumers to buy you product forget about features and start thinking about how you product provides solutions to their problems.
8. There is no such thing as free social media programs.
9. Social media programs need to be tied back to business objectives. Executives need to agree on a measurement criteria for social media programs.
10. Keep it simple. If you can’t clearly explain your strategy and message to your employees than you need to start over.
11. The days of free spending consumers maybe over. Today consumers are saving more and spending less. It’s all about needs rather than want.
12. Web analytics should tell you a story of how your consumers are thinking about your site and products.
13. Employers have all the power now and can lowball new hires and increase workloads on current employees. However this will eventually change and lot more people will seek to leave big companies in search of smaller companies where they can provide a lot more input and be satisfied with their work.
15. Lowering prices is not a marketing or brand strategy.
16. Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors.
17. Learn to see the world in the eyes of your customer or website visit.
18. Simplicity is the new currency.
19.Don’t favor credentials over passion.
20. Speed has become even more of a competitive advantage in the age of social media.

Rich’s Rules of New Economy

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Posted in Business, health, Health 2.0, Web 2.0 | Leave a Comment »

Public Health Communication À la Obama

Posted by drneelesh on September 3, 2009

US Senator Barack Obama campaigning in New Ham...





Recently read this post by R. Craig Lefebvre, who is the Adjunct Professor of Prevention and Community Health at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. In it, he points out the lessons we can learn from Obama”s campaign and use in Health communication


Lessons for public health campaigns include the following:

  • Consider new media–social networking sites, uploaded videos, mobile text messages and blogs—as part of a comprehensive media mix.
  • Encourage horizontal (i.e., peer to peer and social network) communications of campaign messages as social influence and modeling are important drivers of behavior. Embrace user-generated messages and content, especially in the case where top-down campaign messages are straight-forward and translatable by the public.
  • Use new media to encourage small acts of engagement. Small acts of engagement lay the groundwork for relationship building and larger tasks in the future. are important for relationship building and can lead to larger acts of engagement in the future.
  • Use social media to facilitate in-person grassroots activities, not to substitute for them.

I have following his blog on Social marketing and I always get to appreciate a fresh and different view on all issues he discusses. Anyone interested in Social marketing/Health marketing should definitely follow him.You can find more of his interesting ideas here.

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Posted in Facebook, health | Leave a Comment »

Public Health Communication À la Obama

Posted by drneelesh on September 3, 2009

US Senator Barack Obama campaigning in New Ham...





Recently read this post by R. Craig Lefebvre, who is the Adjunct Professor of Prevention and Community Health at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. In it, he points out the lessons we can learn from Obama”s campaign and use in Health communication


Lessons for public health campaigns include the following:

  • Consider new media–social networking sites, uploaded videos, mobile text messages and blogs—as part of a comprehensive media mix.
  • Encourage horizontal (i.e., peer to peer and social network) communications of campaign messages as social influence and modeling are important drivers of behavior. Embrace user-generated messages and content, especially in the case where top-down campaign messages are straight-forward and translatable by the public.
  • Use new media to encourage small acts of engagement. Small acts of engagement lay the groundwork for relationship building and larger tasks in the future. are important for relationship building and can lead to larger acts of engagement in the future.
  • Use social media to facilitate in-person grassroots activities, not to substitute for them.

I have following his blog on Social marketing and I always get to appreciate a fresh and different view on all issues he discusses. Anyone interested in Social marketing/Health marketing should definitely follow him.You can find more of his interesting ideas here.

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Posted in Facebook, health | Leave a Comment »

Basics of Cerebrovascular accidents

Posted by drneelesh on July 18, 2009

Legendary CBS newscaster Walter Cronkite, who many referred to as “Uncle Walt,” has passed away, CBS News reports. He was 92 years old. As the CBS anchorman for almost 20 years, he was one of the most trusted faces in the American media. Reports say that he died due to a “cerebro-vascular accident” (also called Stroke) without specifying the exact pathology.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disturbed in some way. As a result, brain cells are starved of oxygen. This causes some cells to die and leaves other cells damaged. Most strokes happen when a blood clot blocks one of the arteries (blood vessels) that carry blood to the brain. This type of stroke is called an ischaemic stroke. Cerebral hemorrhage is when a blood vessel bursts inside the brain and bleeds (hemorrhages). With a hemorrhagic stroke, blood seeps into the brain tissue and causes extra damage.

  • Smokers
  • Irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation)
  • Diabetes

Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to decreasing mortality due to a stroke. A transient ischemic attack (known as a TIA or ministroke) is similar to a stroke except that, with a TIA, the symptoms go away completely within 24 hours. People who have a TIA are very likely to have a stroke in the near future.

The most common early signs of a CVA are:

  • weakness down one side of the body, ranging from numbness to paralysis that can affect the arm and leg. Often, the weakness starts at a focal point and increases over the next few hours as the hemorrhage increases.
  • weakness down one side of the face, causing the mouth to droop. Speech may become slurry and swallowing becomes difficult.
  • severe headache and sudden loss of vision.
  • confusion, vomiting and loss of balance.

The World Health Organization estimates that 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide each year, resulting in 5 million deaths and 5 million people permanently disabled.Stroke can occur in patients of all ages, including children. The Risk of stroke increases with age, especially in patients older than 64 years, in whom 75% of all strokes occur. Many people recover completely after a stroke. For others, it can take many months to recover from a stroke. Physical therapy and other retraining methods are greatly improving rehabilitation and recovery.

Posted in CVA, health, stroke | Leave a Comment »

Basics of Cerebrovascular accidents

Posted by drneelesh on July 18, 2009

Legendary CBS newscaster Walter Cronkite, who many referred to as “Uncle Walt,” has passed away, CBS News reports. He was 92 years old. As the CBS anchorman for almost 20 years, he was one of the most trusted faces in the American media. Reports say that he died due to a “cerebro-vascular accident” (also called Stroke) without specifying the exact pathology.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is disturbed in some way. As a result, brain cells are starved of oxygen. This causes some cells to die and leaves other cells damaged. Most strokes happen when a blood clot blocks one of the arteries (blood vessels) that carry blood to the brain. This type of stroke is called an ischaemic stroke. Cerebral hemorrhage is when a blood vessel bursts inside the brain and bleeds (hemorrhages). With a hemorrhagic stroke, blood seeps into the brain tissue and causes extra damage.

  • Smokers
  • Irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation)
  • Diabetes

Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to decreasing mortality due to a stroke. A transient ischemic attack (known as a TIA or ministroke) is similar to a stroke except that, with a TIA, the symptoms go away completely within 24 hours. People who have a TIA are very likely to have a stroke in the near future.

The most common early signs of a CVA are:

  • weakness down one side of the body, ranging from numbness to paralysis that can affect the arm and leg. Often, the weakness starts at a focal point and increases over the next few hours as the hemorrhage increases.
  • weakness down one side of the face, causing the mouth to droop. Speech may become slurry and swallowing becomes difficult.
  • severe headache and sudden loss of vision.
  • confusion, vomiting and loss of balance.

The World Health Organization estimates that 15 million people suffer a stroke worldwide each year, resulting in 5 million deaths and 5 million people permanently disabled.Stroke can occur in patients of all ages, including children. The Risk of stroke increases with age, especially in patients older than 64 years, in whom 75% of all strokes occur. Many people recover completely after a stroke. For others, it can take many months to recover from a stroke. Physical therapy and other retraining methods are greatly improving rehabilitation and recovery.

Posted in CVA, health, stroke | Leave a Comment »

Propofol as Drug of Abuse

Posted by drneelesh on July 1, 2009

Is Propofol, or Diprivan what Michael Jackson used for (drug) abuse?


According to Cherilyn Lee, a registered nurse who operates a Los Angeles-based nutritional counseling business, in California, “Jackson was complaining of insomnia and pleaded for her to get him some (Diprivan)”. Other reports claim Propofol was recovered from his residence. This conversation reportedly occurred in April of this year. Preliminary reports say that M.J died of cardiac arrest, which is within the possible effects of unmonitored Diprivan use. (A rapid bolus injection can result in undesirable cardiorespiratory depression including hypotension, apnea, airway obstruction, and oxygen desaturation.)

Diprivan is a general anesthetic, used to start or maintain anesthesia during certain surgeries, tests, or procedures. It is available in a white vial of 20, 50 and 100 ml (containing 10mg/ml.).Most adults require 2 to 2.5 mg/kg of the drug ( approx. 10 to 15 ml). DIPRIVAN Injectable Emulsion is an IV sedative-hypnotic agent and can cause potentiation of other narcotic drugs and benzodiazepines when used together. The most common side-effects include Change in mood or emotions; dizziness; drowsiness; lack of coordination. It is given intravenously, usually within the operation theater or in a clinic. It has a rapid onset of action ( within 1 min) and short duration of action (approximately 10 min but is dose dependent).It has direct cardiodepressant effects, leading to decreased blood pressure and heart rate in higher doses. Its actions causing decreased heart rate and respiratory rate mean that use of propofol is done only under continuous monitoring of vital signs.Diprivan is not meant for use in pediatrics and elderly population since its safety has not been established in these populations. Prolonged use of propofol results in accumulation of the drug in body tissues and increases the duration of action as well as chances of overdose.

Rarely, Cases of death due to propofol have been discussed in medical literature. All these cases have occurred in hospital settings only.It is definitely not meant for home use and this is the first time I have heard of Diprivan being used as a drug of abuse outside hospital settings.

Euphoria, sexual hallucinations and disinhibition have been described on recovery of propofol anaesthesia. These effects could explain the recreational use of the drug. Moreover, several experimental studies strongly suggest the potential for abuse and dependence on propofol,and few cases of abuse and dependency have been described, mostly in medical professionals. As propofol is generally not recognized as a substance of abuse, and because of its safe profile, it is important to remember that rare adverse reactions of propofol could produce death in a context of abuse, even at therapeutic dose range, in the absence of ventilatory and medical assistance.

British Journal of Anaesthesia 2006 97(2):268; doi:10.1093/bja/ael168I

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Posted in Drugs, health | Leave a Comment »

Pubmed search gets simple !

Posted by drneelesh on April 3, 2009


PubMed is a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals for biomedical articles back to 1948. PubMed includes links to full text articles and other related resources. The search volumes at Pubmed are enormous!!




Many people i know do not derive the full benefits of that LARGE library – Pubmed. Most stop at simple article searches and then get lost in the thousands of results which pop up. The few who go for advanced search tend to stop at one or maximum two attributes. It has always been a bit hard to master the Pubmed maze. So now Pubmed has come up with a new improved design for its search Function.

http://v.wordpress.com/HvdBEiRR
Video by Melissa Rethlefsen, Librarian, LRC – Mayo Medical School

PubMed’s new Advanced Search screen is designed to replace the current tabs in PubMed (Limits, History, Index, etc.) and the Single Citation Matcher.Its more intutive and all the attributes are listed on one page to help you choose easily. I found it better than before. Take a look.

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