Medical Communication

Archive for the ‘India’ Category

>Top 12 Ranked Web sites in India for December 2010:

Posted by drneelesh on January 29, 2011

>

188px-India_(orthographic_projection).svg
Alexa – Top Sites in India

Top Sites in India ranked for December 2010

The 1 month rank is calculated using a combination of average daily visitors and pageviews over the past month. The site with the highest combination of visitors and pageviews is ranked #1.

1) Google India
google.co.in
Indian version of this popular search engine. Search the whole web or only webpages from India…. More Interfaces offered in English, Hindi, Bengali, Telugu, Marathi and Tamil.

2) Google
google.com
Enables users to search the Web, Usenet, and images. Features include PageRank, caching and tra… Morenslation of results, and an option to find similar pages. The company’s focus is developing search technology.

3) Facebook
facebook.com
A social utility that connects people, to keep up with friends, upload photos, share links and … Morevideos.

4) Yahoo!
yahoo.com
A major internet portal and service provider offering search results, customizable content, cha… Moretrooms, free e-mail, clubs, and pager.

5) YouTube – Broadcast yourself
youtube.com
YouTube is a way to get your videos to the people who matter to you. Upload, tag and share your… More videos worldwide!
 
6) Blogger.com
blogspot.com
Free, automated weblog publishing tool that sends updates to a site via FTP.
 
7) Wikipedia
wikipedia.org
A free encyclopedia built collaboratively using wiki software. (Creative Commons Attribution-Sh… MoreareAlike License).

8) orkut.co.in
orkut.co.in
 
9) Rediff.com India Ltd.
rediff.com
Online portal with free e-mail and many other services.

10) Twitter
twitter.com
Social networking and microblogging service utilising instant messaging, SMS or a web interface..

11) LinkedIn
linkedin.com
A networking tool to find connections to recommended job candidates, industry experts and busin… Moreess partners. Allows registered users to maintain a list of contact details of people they know and trust in business.
 
12) Indiatimes
indiatimes.com
Portal site; includes news stories under subject headings, and links to other information sources.es.

Analysis and Pointers:

a) At least half of these dozen are hardcore social networking sites.Orkut is still doing reasonably well in India, and Facebook has fast climbed to number 3, after the obligatory Google Search.

b) Google India is on the first position and we wonder how many choose to surf the net in their local languages. This information can transform the way content is produced in India currently.If this data can be gathered, it will allow content creators to better plan their offerings.

c) The only two India based entities, Rediff and Indiatimes are web portals, with a strong presence in the e-commerce space. These two being popular shopping sites, this is another pointer to increasing online expenditure habits being formed.

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Posted in Asia, Google, India | Leave a Comment »

Asia Now Fastest-Growing Region for Twitter, India at Number 4 in Asia

Posted by drneelesh on July 2, 2010

Twitter

Asia Now First, Fastest-Growing Region for Twitter: “- Via ReadWriteWeb.com

According to a new study by Semiocast, Asia is now the region that produces the most Twitter posts, surpassing North America, which declined 7% in the last three months. Asia rose 5.5% in the same time period, to 37%. It is also the fastest-growing region in terms of Twitter use.The U.S. is still number one in terms of countries, with 25% of Twitter messages, down from 30% in March. But the second and third positions belong to Japan and Indonesia with 18% and 12% respectively. Indonesia knocked Brazil out of third position.
South Korea enters the top 10 at the 7th position. More than 2% of messages are sent from South Korea, up from 1% three months ago. India, the fourth Twitter nation in Asia, represents less than 1% of messages. The Paris-based real-time web data service surveyed 2.9 million messages on one day, June 22.

semiocast_study_001.png

semiocast_countries.png

It gets interesting for us in India.

Posted in Asia, India, Twitter | Leave a Comment »

Fighting Swine Flu in India

Posted by drneelesh on August 21, 2009

188px-India_(orthographic_projection).svgImage by drneelesh via Flickr

On 14 th august, Friday night, after facing flake for the past two weeks on the bungled handling of Swine Flu epidemic in India, the government has come up with a better set of guidelines.The new guidelines allow ALL doctors to treat for Swine Flu (earlier only designated hospitals and doctors could treat Swine flu!!)The guidelines were finalized after a five-hour meeting chaired by Health and Family Welfare Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad.

The patients have been categorized as follows:

* Category A: Patients with mild fever plus cough/sore throat with or without body ache, headache, diarrhoea and vomiting. They do not require Oseltamivir and should be treated for the symptoms mentioned above. The patients should be monitored for their progress and reassessed after 24 to 48 hours by the doctor. No testing of the patient for H1N1 is required. Patients should confine themselves at home and avoid mixing with the public and high risk members in the family.( I agree with this)

* Category B: (i) In addition to all the signs and symptoms of Category A, if the patient has high grade fever and severe sore throat, he/she may require home isolation and Oseltamivir; (ii) In addition to all the signs and symptoms of Category A, individuals having one or more of the following high risk conditions shall be treated with Oseltamivir: children under five, pregnant women, those above 65 years, those with lung diseases, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, blood disorders, diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer and HIV/AIDS; Patients on long term cortisone therapy. No H1N1 tests are required for Category-B (i) and (ii). Such patients should confine themselves at home and avoid mixing with the public and high-risk members in the family.( I think all such cases be tested for H1N1, and antiviral therapy started without delay)

* Category C: In addition to the symptoms of Categories A and B, if the patient has one or more of the following: breathlessness, chest pain, drowsiness, fall in blood pressure, sputum mixed with blood, bluish discolouration of nails; irritability among small children, refusal to accept feed; worsening of underlying chronic conditions. Such patients require testing, immediate hospitalisation and treatment.( All such patients should be started on antivirals without even waiting for test results!!, its already late!!)

During the meeting, various guidelines and protocols developed by the World Health Organisation, Geneva, the Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Atlanta, United States, and the National Health Service, United Kingdom, were also discussed.The death toll has already reached 26 today, and is rising exponentially. Hope these guidelines help, but i really think its too little too late.

Related articles

Posted in flu, India, Influenza | Leave a Comment »

Fighting Swine Flu in India

Posted by drneelesh on August 21, 2009

188px-India_(orthographic_projection).svgImage by drneelesh via Flickr

On 14 th august, Friday night, after facing flake for the past two weeks on the bungled handling of Swine Flu epidemic in India, the government has come up with a better set of guidelines.The new guidelines allow ALL doctors to treat for Swine Flu (earlier only designated hospitals and doctors could treat Swine flu!!)The guidelines were finalized after a five-hour meeting chaired by Health and Family Welfare Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad.

The patients have been categorized as follows:

* Category A: Patients with mild fever plus cough/sore throat with or without body ache, headache, diarrhoea and vomiting. They do not require Oseltamivir and should be treated for the symptoms mentioned above. The patients should be monitored for their progress and reassessed after 24 to 48 hours by the doctor. No testing of the patient for H1N1 is required. Patients should confine themselves at home and avoid mixing with the public and high risk members in the family.( I agree with this)

* Category B: (i) In addition to all the signs and symptoms of Category A, if the patient has high grade fever and severe sore throat, he/she may require home isolation and Oseltamivir; (ii) In addition to all the signs and symptoms of Category A, individuals having one or more of the following high risk conditions shall be treated with Oseltamivir: children under five, pregnant women, those above 65 years, those with lung diseases, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, blood disorders, diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer and HIV/AIDS; Patients on long term cortisone therapy. No H1N1 tests are required for Category-B (i) and (ii). Such patients should confine themselves at home and avoid mixing with the public and high-risk members in the family.( I think all such cases be tested for H1N1, and antiviral therapy started without delay)

* Category C: In addition to the symptoms of Categories A and B, if the patient has one or more of the following: breathlessness, chest pain, drowsiness, fall in blood pressure, sputum mixed with blood, bluish discolouration of nails; irritability among small children, refusal to accept feed; worsening of underlying chronic conditions. Such patients require testing, immediate hospitalisation and treatment.( All such patients should be started on antivirals without even waiting for test results!!, its already late!!)

During the meeting, various guidelines and protocols developed by the World Health Organisation, Geneva, the Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Atlanta, United States, and the National Health Service, United Kingdom, were also discussed.The death toll has already reached 26 today, and is rising exponentially. Hope these guidelines help, but i really think its too little too late. Related articles


Posted in flu, India, Influenza | Leave a Comment »

Cover yourself up !!

Posted by drneelesh on August 13, 2009

The Swine flu death toll in India has risen to 20 in two weeks. The disease is especially partial to young kids, girls and elderly persons with co-existing chronic disease. Many of the victims are either foreign residents or tourists, which points to another easily demarcated section of population.

Mark IV Medical communications is a Coimbatore based multimedia and medical animation company with offices in USA and Germany. Most of the creative staff at Mark IV is young, with many female content developers. A large part of their clientele is situated abroad; therefore regular contact with foreign returned persons cannot be avoided. To solve its particular position, Mark IV has come out with a well thought out and inked action plan.

Company policy and guidelines-
* Use Soap and water to wash hands a few times every day (soap bottles provided)

* Anyone with symptoms of flu/headache/fever for consecutive 12 hours should use a face-mask (available with administrator). Isolation and proper rehydration is all that is required in a number of cases.

* Any employee experiencing flu/flu like symptoms should avail leave for 3 days/till the symptoms improve.

* Under direction of Dr.Neelesh, any suspected case shall be provided face masks, immediate symptomatic care and antivirals (Zanamivir).

* Case confirmation and furthur management shall be done at Govt. designated Hospitals.

“At MarkIV, we have an adequate stock of facemasks, anti-allergics and anti-viral medications. We are in a position to handle any acute emergency involving Swine flu infection. All suspected cases shall be sent to government designated hospitals for full treatment”says Dr.Neelesh from Mark IV Medical Communications. MarkIV has also produced a few short presentations and videos on Swine Flu for dissemination of general awareness.

Prevention of Swine flu- Guidelines
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/9662043/Use-of-Proper-Masks-during-Flu-epidemic
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/document-preview.aspx?doc_id=8556230

Related articles

Also added is a podcast interview-

Tadataka Yamada, M.D. explains the national and international availability of swine flu vaccine is hampered by several barriers.

Swine flu vaccine. C;liock to listen within the page.

Posted in India, Influenza, Mark IV | Leave a Comment »

Cover yourself up !!

Posted by drneelesh on August 13, 2009

The Swine flu death toll in India has risen to 20 in two weeks. The disease is especially partial to young kids, girls and elderly persons with co-existing chronic disease. Many of the victims are either foreign residents or tourists, which points to another easily demarcated section of population.

Mark IV Medical communications is a Coimbatore based multimedia and medical animation company with offices in USA and Germany. Most of the creative staff at Mark IV is young, with many female content developers. A large part of their clientele is situated abroad; therefore regular contact with foreign returned persons cannot be avoided. To solve its particular position, Mark IV has come out with a well thought out and inked action plan.

Company policy and guidelines-
* Use Soap and water to wash hands a few times every day (soap bottles provided)

* Anyone with symptoms of flu/headache/fever for consecutive 12 hours should use a face-mask (available with administrator). Isolation and proper rehydration is all that is required in a number of cases.

* Any employee experiencing flu/flu like symptoms should avail leave for 3 days/till the symptoms improve.

* Under direction of Dr.Neelesh, any suspected case shall be provided face masks, immediate symptomatic care and antivirals (Zanamivir).

* Case confirmation and furthur management shall be done at Govt. designated Hospitals.

“At MarkIV, we have an adequate stock of facemasks, anti-allergics and anti-viral medications. We are in a position to handle any acute emergency involving Swine flu infection. All suspected cases shall be sent to government designated hospitals for full treatment”says Dr.Neelesh from Mark IV Medical Communications. MarkIV has also produced a few short presentations and videos on Swine Flu for dissemination of general awareness.

Prevention of Swine flu- Guidelines
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/9662043/Use-of-Proper-Masks-during-Flu-epidemic
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/document-preview.aspx?doc_id=8556230

Related articles

Also added is a podcast interview-

Tadataka Yamada, M.D. explains the national and international availability of swine flu vaccine is hampered by several barriers.

Swine flu vaccine. C;liock to listen within the page.

Posted in India, Influenza | Leave a Comment »

Marketing prescription drugs in India- Guidelines

Posted by drneelesh on June 27, 2009

188px-India_(orthographic_projection).svg

The guidelines for pharmaceutical marketing are typically debated all over the world, more so in India. Many issues are not clear and the drug industry interprets the rules the best it can . Cases of unethical promotion of drugs to the health care industry come up with regularity in the western world. Fortunately, no major case has been reported in the Indian media at present. But thats because many such unethical promotional activities havent come to light. There is an urgent need to inform all the concerned parties of the regulatory Dos and Donts of pharmaceutical marketing in India.

Promotion of drugs in India is governed by three major documents. THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS ACT, 1940 is defined as An Act to regulate the import, manufacture, distribution and sale of drugs and cosmetics in India. It has last been amended in 1995 and new amendments are overdue. The Rules 96 and 97 of THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS RULES, 1945 describe the essential information to be provided regarding labeling of drugs. The product monograph should comprise the full prescribing information necessary to enable a physician to use the drug properly. It should include description, actions, indications, dosage precaution, drug interactions, warnings and adverse reactions.

The OPPI code of conduct ( effective since 1st January 2007) sets out the guidelines to be followed for promotion of prescription drugs to the health care industry. It is based on the IFPMA code and incorporates local region ( India) specific guidelines. it sets out certain principles basic to the ethical promotion of pharmaceuticals in the country. Though it is widely followed, it is not legally binding and the final responsibility for implementation lies with the pharmaceutical marketing organizations themselves.

Below is a short presentation document outlining the Major points in marketing pharmacutical products to the health care industry.
http://bit.ly/nHqwE–

Posted in Business, Guidelines, India, marketing | Leave a Comment »

Marketing prescription drugs in India- Guidelines

Posted by drneelesh on June 27, 2009

188px-India_(orthographic_projection).svg

The guidelines for pharmaceutical marketing are typically debated all over the world, more so in India. Many issues are not clear and the drug industry interprets the rules the best it can . Cases of unethical promotion of drugs to the health care industry come up with regularity in the western world. Fortunately, no major case has been reported in the Indian media at present. But thats because many such unethical promotional activities havent come to light. There is an urgent need to inform all the concerned parties of the regulatory Dos and Donts of pharmaceutical marketing in India.

Promotion of drugs in India is governed by three major documents. THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS ACT, 1940 is defined as An Act to regulate the import, manufacture, distribution and sale of drugs and cosmetics in India. It has last been amended in 1995 and new amendments are overdue. The Rules 96 and 97 of THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS RULES, 1945 describe the essential information to be provided regarding labeling of drugs. The product monograph should comprise the full prescribing information necessary to enable a physician to use the drug properly. It should include description, actions, indications, dosage precaution, drug interactions, warnings and adverse reactions.

The OPPI code of conduct ( effective since 1st January 2007) sets out the guidelines to be followed for promotion of prescription drugs to the health care industry. It is based on the IFPMA code and incorporates local region ( India) specific guidelines. it sets out certain principles basic to the ethical promotion of pharmaceuticals in the country. Though it is widely followed, it is not legally binding and the final responsibility for implementation lies with the pharmaceutical marketing organizations themselves.

Below is a short presentation document outlining the Major points in marketing pharmacutical products to the health care industry.
http://bit.ly/nHqwE–

Posted in Business, Guidelines, India, marketing | Leave a Comment »

Private Equity in Medical education

Posted by drneelesh on January 5, 2009

PSYCHIATRIST'S OFFICE FROM THE 1958 FILM, "TER...Image by spike55151 via Flickr

It seems that finally the Government has woken up and smelt the coffee.
Medical education is BIG business, and you cant keep big players out of this by allowing only Trusts and non-profits to start new medical colleges.( many of which are Sham)Medical education may soon become a profit-making venture and private players investing in it would have to pay tax on the profit they make from it. The government is considering a proposal to allow private sector investments in medical education under the public-private partnership (PPP) model. The idea is to encourage investment in the sector to meet the shortage of medical professionals in the country.

At present, only governments, universities, trusts or charitable societies can set up medical colleges. Private companies, which want to establish medical education centres, can do so only through a not-for-profit organisation and are exempt from income tax.

With the changed norms in place, private players are likely to face lesser entry barriers while making big investments in the medical education sector. “We have finalised the proposal to relax the norms for setting up medical colleges. The new guidelines include private sector participation through PPP model among other things. We have already submitted the proposal to the Medical Council of India,” a health ministry official close to the development told ET.

E&Y partner (risk advisory services) Kali Prasad said: “The move will attract private sector participation includingprivate equity into medical education. This will help companies to make investments and make reasonable returns over time while the government will also benefit as companies will have to pay tax.”

The new guidelines seek to relax other rigid regulations such as land area restrictions and the teacher-to-student ratio. “The proposals also suggest that medical colleges may be allowed to have minimum 25 acres in two locations within 12 km, instead of the 25 acres of contiguous land required now,” the official said.

The move came after the Planning Commission had recommended opening of the medical education sector for private sector participation to increase the supply of human resources at all levels while the country is facing an acute shortage of professionals in the healthcare sector. According to a Planning Commission report, for every 10,000 Indians, there is one doctor. India is short by around six lakh doctors, 10 lakh nurses and two lakh dental surgeons.

“A group headed by the secretary of health has examined and actively considered relaxing the norms for investing in medical education. We are looking at an option to completely open up private sector participation and also easing infrastructure norms. A notification to this effect may be made soon by the health ministry,” a senior Planning Commission official said.

The move is expected to boost corporate chains, most of which have planned to set up medical education hubs to meet its human resources need. Delhi-based Fortis Healthcare has plans of setting up 10 medical cities in the next 10 years with an investment of over Rs 5,000 crore.

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Posted in education, health, India | Leave a Comment »

Examples of Medical Education systems

Posted by drneelesh on October 14, 2008

Medical education – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Presently, in England, a typical medicine course at university is 5 years or 4 years if the student already holds a degree. Amongst some institutions and for some students, it may be 6 years (including the selection of an intercalated BSc—taking one year—at some point after the pre-clinical studies). All programs culminate in the Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery degree (abbreviated MB BChir, BM BCh, MB BCh, MB ChB, BM BS, MB BS etc.). This is followed by 2 clinical foundation years afterwards, namely F1 and F2 similar to internship training. Students register with the UK General Medical Council at the end of F1. At the end of F2, they may pursue further years of study.

In the US and Canada, a potential medical student must first complete an undergraduate degree in any subject before applying to a graduate medical school to pursue an (M.D. or D.O.) program. Some students opt for the research-focused MD/PhD dual degree, which is usually completed in 7-8 years. There are certain courses which are pre-requisite for being accepted to medical school, such as general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, mathematics, biology, English, labwork, etc. The specific requirements vary by school.

In Australia, there are two pathways to a medical degree. Students can choose to take a five or six year undergraduate medical degree Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS or BMed) straight from high school, or complete a bachelors degree (generally three years, usually in the medical sciences) and then apply for a four year graduate entry Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program.

In India, admission to a medical college is primarily through a national level entrance exam after finishing 10+2 years of schooling. The Course itself lasts for 4.5 years, followed by a compulsory one year internship rotation leading to a M.B.B.S degree. Three year specialization courses leading to a M.D / M.S is usually the next step for most young M.B.B.S graduates in India.

Posted in education, India, medical, systems | Leave a Comment »